MCN Blogs
David Poland

By David Poland poland@moviecitynews.com

Sundance ’13: Day One

The tone seems to be being set by opening night this year.

There is a Pablo Larrain thing going on, as he produced Crystal Fairy & The Magical Cactus and 2012, and his star from No co-created the doc, Who Is Diyani Cristal ?. Pablo’s Oscar-nominated No is also here. Of course, part of the “Pablo thing” is a South American thing, as the indie world continues to lean harder and harder on international films and not American Indie. A.I. is still in the house, in the Dramatic Competition, but I feel like there is a sense that the awards show is becoming the ghetto here and the real interesting stuff is elsewhere. (Crystal Fairy is in the World Dramatic Competition.)

Blue Caprice is going to be a hot topic as the festival moves on (it opens Saturday), combining the cool distance of European cinema with a very American issue – especially right now – of gun violence as a solution for the disaffected. Add on top of that an awards-level performance by Isaiah Washington and there will be talk about why the film is in the “Next” section and not in the main competition over some of the more expected Sundance fare.

And then there is the sex. We’ve already seen Gaby Hoffman running around buck naked – and not highly sexualized – in the title role of Crystal Fairy. But just wait til they get a load of dick. James Franco is the finger in the ass of Sundance this year, with two strong pieces. One is, in theory, about recreating the missing footage from Billy Friedkin’s Cruising. But it’s not. It’s much more about the idea of how much sex of a presumably different persuasion a straight guy can take. And then, Kink.com, which Franco produced, is about a fetish site that produces a lot of content of all flavors. Of course, they are also a business, so almost exactly like Gawker, they rank the response to the material each in-house director creates and everyone is paid accordingly. But both movies are about limits, ultimately. What are they? Should we all be considering broader ones… even if we ultimately reject them? And how much of this is choice – not on a participatory level, but on one’s personal turn-ons or offs – and how much of it is just part of who each of us is.

Let’s hope the entire festival is a bumpy, bumpy ride.

Be Sociable, Share!

2 Responses to “Sundance ’13: Day One”

  1. A Moose says:

    Billy?

    Really- who the bloody hell are you to refer to Mr Friedkin in that matter?

  2. brack says:

    Hey David, did you catch Before Midnight?

    I hear the buzz on that one is good. Guess I will buy the inevitable Blu-ray box set.

The Hot Blog

Quote Unquotesee all »

It shows how out of it I was in trying to be in it, acknowledging that I was out of it to myself, and then thinking, “Okay, how do I stop being out of it? Well, I get some legitimate illogical narrative ideas” — some novel, you know?

So I decided on three writers that I might be able to option their material and get some producer, or myself as producer, and then get some writer to do a screenplay on it, and maybe make a movie.

And so the three projects were “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep,” “Naked Lunch” and a collection of Bukowski. Which, in 1975, forget it — I mean, that was nuts. Hollywood would not touch any of that, but I was looking for something commercial, and I thought that all of these things were coming.

There would be no Blade Runner if there was no Ray Bradbury. I couldn’t find Philip K. Dick. His agent didn’t even know where he was. And so I gave up.

I was walking down the street and I ran into Bradbury — he directed a play that I was going to do as an actor, so we know each other, but he yelled “hi” — and I’d forgot who he was.

So at my girlfriend Barbara Hershey’s urging — I was with her at that moment — she said, “Talk to him! That guy really wants to talk to you,” and I said “No, fuck him,” and keep walking.

But then I did, and then I realized who it was, and I thought, “Wait, he’s in that realm, maybe he knows Philip K. Dick.” I said, “You know a guy named—” “Yeah, sure — you want his phone number?”

My friend paid my rent for a year while I wrote, because it turned out we couldn’t get a writer. My friends kept on me about, well, if you can’t get a writer, then you write.”
~ Hampton Fancher

“That was the most disappointing thing to me in how this thing was played. Is that I’m on the phone with you now, after all that’s been said, and the fundamental distinction between what James is dealing with in these other cases is not actually brought to the fore. The fundamental difference is that James Franco didn’t seek to use his position to have sex with anyone. There’s not a case of that. He wasn’t using his position or status to try to solicit a sexual favor from anyone. If he had — if that were what the accusation involved — the show would not have gone on. We would have folded up shop and we would have not completed the show. Because then it would have been the same as Harvey Weinstein, or Les Moonves, or any of these cases that are fundamental to this new paradigm. Did you not notice that? Why did you not notice that? Is that not something notable to say, journalistically? Because nobody could find the voice to say it. I’m not just being rhetorical. Why is it that you and the other critics, none of you could find the voice to say, “You know, it’s not this, it’s that”? Because — let me go on and speak further to this. If you go back to the L.A. Times piece, that’s what it lacked. That’s what they were not able to deliver. The one example in the five that involved an issue of a sexual act was between James and a woman he was dating, who he was not working with. There was no professional dynamic in any capacity.

~ David Simon